2014 Bevan Symposium

Please join the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences April 24-25 for a FREE PUBLIC symposium featuring internationally-recognized experts! You can register and find the symposium agenda online at The Bevan Series On Sustainable Fisheries.

When
April 24-25, 2014, 8 AM to 5:30 PM

Where
University of Washington, Fishery Sciences Auditorium, 102
1122 NE Boat Street, Seattle, WA 09105

Issues at the fore in the land of Magnuson and Stevens

The Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA) is the Nation’s premier law governing fisheries conservation and management. Since its inception in 1976 the Act has been amended as the Sustainable Fishery Act in 1996, and most recently reauthorized in 2006; in each instance based on substantial changes to correct, clarify and expand initial provisions contained in National Standards that guide planning and implementation. Requirement for reauthorization provides opportunity to examine effectiveness of myriad provisions intended to curb overfishing, reduce bycatch, and sustain communities, among many goals.

It is timely that a symposium focused on MSA be held since the Act is now being reviewed for reauthorization, and both Senate and House committees are actively engaged in hearing perspectives from diverse stakeholders that will guide language intended to preserve effective aspects of the act, correct policies and procedures that do not comply with National Standards in various ways, and sharpen process and procedure used by Regional Councils in their planning and implementation of the Act.

The Bevan Series on Sustainable Fisheries, now in its 14th year at the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences in partnership with the School of Marine and Environmental Affairs, UW, is a proper venue to host a symposium focused on MSA. Following from a national event, Managing Our Nation’s Fisheries in spring 2013, the Bevan-MSA symposium this April 2014 will encourage many stakeholders, including fishery scientists, managers, policy analysts, students, NGOs, Tribes, and Industry, to voice their views on what works, what’s vague, what’s detrimental, and what’s missing from MSA. Focus will be on issues, lessons, and experience drawn from West Coast and North Pacific fisheries, with National context used to provide perspective in eventually drawing a list of priorities to convey to architects redrafting the Act.

To request disability accommodations, contact the University of Washington Disability Services Office at least 10 days in advance of the event: 206-543-6450; 206-685-7264 (fax); 206-543-6452 (TTY); or dso@u.washington.edu (email)

Funding for the Symposium is generously provided by Tanya Bevan, friends of Don Bevan, the UW School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Washington Sea Grant, Marine Conservation Alliance, At Sea Processors Association, North Pacific Fishery Management Counci, Environmental Defense Fund, Packard Foundation, and Bering Sea Fisheries Research Foundation

Without Better Science, BC’s Herring Crisis Could Resurface – TheTyee.ca

Without Better Science, BC's Herring Crisis Could Resurface
TheTyee.ca
It's practically impossible to take the herring's role in the ecosystem into account when assessments are made, said Dr. André Punt at the school of aquatic and fishery sciences at the University of Washington. "Pretty much nobody in the world does that.".

via “school of aquatic and fishery sciences” – Google News

2014 Graduate Student Invited Speaker: Dr. Daniel Costa

School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences

2014 Graduate Student Invited Speaker:

Dr. Daniel Costa, Distinguished Professor of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of California at Santa Cruz

Conservation of Highly Migratory Marine Species: Integration of Physiology, Behavior and Ecology

Thursday, April 17, 2014
4 PM
, Fisheries Sciences (FSH) 102
Reception to follow

Website
http://fish.washington.edu/seminars/InvitedSpeaker/index.html

About Dr. Daniel Costa
Daniel Costa is a Distinguished Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of California at Santa Cruz.  He received his B.A. from the University of California at Los Angeles in 1974, completed his Ph.D. at U.C. Santa Cruz in 1978. He did postdoctoral research at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and he had published over 300 scientific papers. His research focuses on the ecology and physiology of marine mammals and seabirds and he has worked in almost every habitat from the Galapagos to the Antarctic.  His recent work has focused on understanding the relationship between climate-driven oceanographic processes and marine mammal and seabird foraging behavior and success.

 

About the SAFS Graduate Student Invited Speaker Series: 

The Graduate Student Invited Speaker event provides an exciting opportunity for SAFS graduate students to nominate and select a speaker to give a presentation in the school’s spring seminar series. The event was proposed by graduate students in 2007 as a way to contribute to and shape perspectives brought to the school via the seminar series. We seek experts in the fields of ecology, resource management, and conservation to provide insight into novel, constructive approaches to practical problems in aquatic and fishery sciences. Given the diversity of research conducted at SAFS, we are interested in the selected speaker addressing issues and challenges that resonate with the entire SAFS community. Additionally, we hope to be exposed to new tools and intellectual approaches that complement the diversity of methodologies in our department.

Each spring, graduate students are asked to nominate individuals they believe would provide a meaningful visit based on the above guidelines. A vote is held among the graduate students and the winning speaker is invited for the following spring. The event is spear-headed by several graduate students who work over the course of the year to organize the seminar, meetings with graduate students and faculty, and several social events.

Take advantage of other opportunities to interact with Dr. Costa:
Happy hour discussion of Dr. Costa’s research Tuesday April 15, 4:30 PM, College Inn Pub

Schedule a meeting with Dr. Costa on Thursday or Friday (April 17-18): http://doodle.com/3hkhmfbspeu4dtks

Join us for an informal SAFS-sponsored dinner on Thursday April 17 following TGIT. First-come first-serve sign-up here:https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/aarond5/232278

This event is sponsored by the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences.  ***************************************************************************
2014 Graduate Student Invited Speaker Seminar committee:
Aaron David, Donna Hauser, Tim Cline, & Merrill Rudd

Without Better Science, BC’s Herring Crisis Could Resurface – TheTyee.ca

Without Better Science, BC's Herring Crisis Could Resurface
TheTyee.ca
It's practically impossible to take the herring's role in the ecosystem into account when assessments are made, said Dr. André Punt at the school of aquatic and fishery sciences at the University of Washington. "Pretty much nobody in the world does that.".

via “school of aquatic and fishery sciences” – Google News

Migratory Movements of Pygmy Blue Whales (Balaenoptera musculus brevicauda) between Australia and Indonesia as Revealed by Satellite Telemetry.

Migratory Movements of Pygmy Blue Whales (Balaenoptera musculus brevicauda) between Australia and Indonesia as Revealed by Satellite Telemetry.

PLoS One. 2014;9(4):e93578

Authors: Double MC, Andrews-Goff V, Jenner KC, Jenner MN, Laverick SM, Branch TA, Gales NJ

Abstract
In Australian waters during the austral summer, pygmy blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus brevicauda) occur predictably in two distinct feeding areas off western and southern Australia. As with other blue whale subspecies, outside the austral summer their distribution and movements are poorly understood. In order to describe the migratory movements of these whales, we present the satellite telemetry derived movements of eleven individuals tagged off western Australia over two years. Whales were tracked from between 8 and 308 days covering an average distance of 3,009±892 km (mean ± se; range: 832 km-14,101 km) at a rate of 21.94±0.74 km per day (0.09 km-455.80 km/day). Whales were tagged during March and April and ultimately migrated northwards post tag deployment with the exception of a single animal which remained in the vicinity of the Perth Canyon/Naturaliste Plateau for its eight day tracking period. The tagged whales travelled relatively near to the Australian coastline (100.0±1.7 km) until reaching a prominent peninsula in the north-west of the state of Western Australia (North West Cape) after which they travelled offshore (238.0±13.9 km). Whales reached the northern terminus of their migration and potential breeding grounds in Indonesian waters by June. One satellite tag relayed intermittent information to describe aspects of the southern migration from Indonesia with the animal departing around September to arrive in the subtropical frontal zone, south of western Australia in December. Throughout their migratory range, these whales are exposed to impacts associated with industry, fishing and vessel traffic. These movements therefore provide a valuable tool to industry when assessing potential interactions with pygmy blue whales and should be considered by conservation managers and regulators when mitigating impacts of development. This is particularly relevant for this species as it continues to recover from past exploitation.

PMID: 24718589 [PubMed - in process]

via pubmed: school of aquatic an… http://ift.tt/1evR9eC

2014 Bevan Symposium

Please join the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences April 24-25 for a FREE PUBLIC symposium featuring internationally-recognized experts! You can register and find the symposium agenda online at The Bevan Series On Sustainable Fisheries.

When
April 24-25, 2014, 8 AM to 5:30 PM

Where
University of Washington, Fishery Sciences Auditorium, 102
1122 NE Boat Street, Seattle, WA 09105

Issues at the fore in the land of Magnuson and Stevens

The Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA) is the Nation’s premier law governing fisheries conservation and management. Since its inception in 1976 the Act has been amended as the Sustainable Fishery Act in 1996, and most recently reauthorized in 2006; in each instance based on substantial changes to correct, clarify and expand initial provisions contained in National Standards that guide planning and implementation. Requirement for reauthorization provides opportunity to examine effectiveness of myriad provisions intended to curb overfishing, reduce bycatch, and sustain communities, among many goals.

It is timely that a symposium focused on MSA be held since the Act is now being reviewed for reauthorization, and both Senate and House committees are actively engaged in hearing perspectives from diverse stakeholders that will guide language intended to preserve effective aspects of the act, correct policies and procedures that do not comply with National Standards in various ways, and sharpen process and procedure used by Regional Councils in their planning and implementation of the Act.

The Bevan Series on Sustainable Fisheries, now in its 14th year at the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences in partnership with the School of Marine and Environmental Affairs, UW, is a proper venue to host a symposium focused on MSA. Following from a national event, Managing Our Nation’s Fisheries in spring 2013, the Bevan-MSA symposium this April 2014 will encourage many stakeholders, including fishery scientists, managers, policy analysts, students, NGOs, Tribes, and Industry, to voice their views on what works, what’s vague, what’s detrimental, and what’s missing from MSA. Focus will be on issues, lessons, and experience drawn from West Coast and North Pacific fisheries, with National context used to provide perspective in eventually drawing a list of priorities to convey to architects redrafting the Act.

To request disability accommodations, contact the University of Washington Disability Services Office at least 10 days in advance of the event: 206-543-6450; 206-685-7264 (fax); 206-543-6452 (TTY); or dso@u.washington.edu (email)

Funding for the Symposium is generously provided by Tanya Bevan, friends of Don Bevan, the UW School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Washington Sea Grant, Marine Conservation Alliance, At Sea Processors Association, North Pacific Fishery Management Counci, Environmental Defense Fund, Packard Foundation, and Bering Sea Fisheries Research Foundation

Predator avoidance during reproduction: diel movements by spawning sockeye salmon between stream and lake habitats.

Predator avoidance during reproduction: diel movements by spawning sockeye salmon between stream and lake habitats.

J Anim Ecol. 2014 Apr 5;

Authors: Bentley KT, Schindler DE, Cline TJ, Armstrong JB, Macias D, Ciepiela LR, Hilborn R

Abstract
1. Daily movements of mobile organisms between habitats in response to changing trade-offs between predation risk and foraging gains are well established; however, less in known about whether similar tactics are used during reproduction, a time period when many organisms are particularly vulnerable to predators. 2. We investigated the reproductive behaviour of adult sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and the activity of their principal predator, brown bears (Ursus arctos), on streams in southwestern Alaska. Specifically, we continuously monitored movements of salmon between lake habitat, where salmon are invulnerable to bears, and three small streams, where salmon spawn and are highly vulnerable to bears. We conducted our study across 2 years that offered a distinct contrast in bear activity and predation rates. 3. Diel movements by adult sockeye salmon between stream and lake habitat were observed in 51.3 ± 17.7% [mean ± SD] of individuals among years and sites. Fish that moved tended to hold in the lake for most of the day, and then migrated into spawning streams during the night coincident with when bear activity on streams tended to be lowest. Additionally, cyclic movements between lakes and spawning streams were concentrated earlier in the spawning season. 4. Individuals that exhibited diel movements had longer average reproductive life-spans than those who made only one directed movement into a stream. However, the relative effect was dependent on the timing of bear predation, which varied between years. When predation pressure primarily occurred early in the spawning run (i.e., during the height of the diel movements), movers lived 120 – 310% longer than non-movers. If predation pressure was concentrated later in the spawning run (i.e., when most movements had ceased), movers only lived 10-60% longer. 5. Our results suggest a dynamic trade-off in reproductive strategies of sockeye salmon; adults must be in the stream to reproduce, but must also avoid predation long enough to spawn. Given the inter-annual variation in the timing and intensity of predation pressure, the advantages of a particular movement strategy will likely vary among years. Regardless, movements by salmon allowed individuals to exploit fine-scale habitat heterogeneity during reproduction that appears to be a strategy to reduce predation risk on the spawning grounds. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PMID: 24702169 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

via pubmed: school of aquatic an… http://ift.tt/PKuUM2